China’s New Silk Road: Politics, Ambition, and Opportunity

A new global megaproject, unparalleled in scope and ambition, presents vast opportunities and risks for multinationals.

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Dr. May-yi Shaw explores the revival of the ancient Silk Road, meeting businesses and entrepreneurs looking to benefit from the trillions of dollars of spending, in this first phase of the Belt and Road Initiative.


Tales From The New Silk Road

China’s “New Silk Road” is a multibillion dollar project, linking it to European markets via a corridor of trade and investment across Central Asia. Kazakhstan is a major partner, and the two countries speak glowingly of their cooperation. But beneath the veneer of warm words, corruption, bureaucracy, and old antipathies sometimes get in the way.


The New Silk Roads: Will China’s Investments Enrich the World?

The CSIS Freeman Chair in China Studies and the Project on Prosperity and Development cordially invite you to “China’s ‘Belt and Road’ Initiative and Implications for Global Infrastructure Development.”

Featuring
Ziad Haider
Special Representative for Commercial and Business Affairs, Bureau of Economics and Business Affairs, US Department of State

John Hurley
Director, International Debt and Development Policy, US Department of the Treasury

Olin Wethington
Founder and Chairman, Wethington International LLC

Christopher Johnson
Senior Adviser and Freeman Chair in China Studies, CSIS

Moderated by

Daniel Runde
Director, Project on Prosperity and Development;
William A. Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis, CSIS


Peter Nolan on China’s silk road strategy

Keynote held on 7th April 2016 at the wiiw Spring Seminar in Vienna. Peter Nolan is Professor at Cambridge University. Further information on the wiiw Spring Seminar 2016 can be found here: http://wiiw.ac.at/european-integratio…


China’s “Belt and Road” Initiative and Implications for Global Infrastructure Development

The CSIS Freeman Chair in China Studies and the Project on Prosperity and Development cordially invite you to “China’s ‘Belt and Road’ Initiative and Implications for Global Infrastructure Development.” Featuring Ziad Haider Special Representative for Commercial and Business Affairs, Bureau of Economics and Business Affairs, US Department of State John Hurley Director, International Debt and Development Policy, US Department of the Treasury Olin Wethington Founder and Chairman, Wethington International LLC Christopher Johnson Senior Adviser and Freeman Chair in China Studies, CSIS Moderated by Daniel Runde Director, Project on Prosperity and Development; William A. Schreyer Chair in Global Analysis, CSIS


A Strategist’s Guide to China’s Belt and Road Initiative

by David WijeratneMark Rathbone, and Gabriel Wong

As of early 2018, a new elevated railway in Hanoi is giving commuters a smoother journey into the city. The 13.5 kilometer (8.4 mile) line, which snakes across the Vietnamese capital’s shimmering West Lake, is one element of a much larger rail project that will connect the landlocked Yunnan Province in China directly to the northern Vietnamese port city of Hai Phong, providing access to markets in Southeast Asia and beyond.

Many time zones to the west, the London suburb of Barking has the distinction of being the first English town with direct rail access to China. In January 2017, it welcomed the arrival of a freight train that had traveled 12,000 kilometers (7,500 miles) from eastern China’s Zhejiang Province, with a cargo of garments and handbags. The so-called “East Wind” train made history by retracing part of the ancient Silk Road that more than 2,000 years earlier had linked northern China to the Mediterranean. The railroad traversed Kazakhstan, Russia, Belarus, Poland, Germany, Belgium, and France on its journey to Britain. But it should not be regarded as a pure U.K.-to-China transport link. Once fully operational, it will pick up and drop off goods at many countries in between, thereby opening up parts of Russia and Central Asia that have never before had this type of entrée to the global economy.

These rail projects, which share the same visionary origin, are just two of dozens of road, rail, port, and power generation plans within China’s much-vaunted Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Formerly known as One Belt, One Road, this vast, interconnected infrastructure project spans at least 65 countries with a combined population of 4.4 billion and about a third of the world’s economic output.

The plan is notable not just for its scale, but for its time frame. Its first phase focuses on infrastructure development, specifically in transportation, communications, and power. The second phase will involve softer sectors such as e-commerce, healthcare, education, and financial services. The first projects are just starting now, and the whole initiative is not expected to conclude until at least 2050.

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